Welcome to the

AHMC365 Newsletter

Vol 46

February  2018

Black History Month 

 

 

 

The U.S. Embassy has partnered with the African American Association of Ghana (AAAG) to celebrate Black History Month. This is an annual observance each February in the United States, Canada and a handful of other countries. During Black History Month, special efforts are made to highlight historical figures and events in the African diaspora.   The U.S. Embassy has partnered with the African American Association of Ghana (AAAG) to celebrate Black History Month. This is an annual observance each February in the United States, Canada and a handful of other countries.  During Black History Month, special efforts are made to highlight historical figures and events in the African diaspora.

 

 

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Featured News

 

North Korea Slams US Over Racism, Human Rights Violations

 

 

 

After years of diplomatic standoffs over terrorism, resources, and territory, North African nations hope one dish can finally bring to the same table: couscous. A group of experts from the Maghreb region has come together to work on a common campaign to have couscous recognized by Unesco's list of intangible cultural hiertiage. The small balls of rolled and crushed wheat or cereals  is  usually steamed and are the staple for many in North Africa, and a ready made version can be found in most grocery stores around the world.

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Tiffany Haddish Exposes Racism With Comedy

 

 

The actress Tiffany Haddish has revealed that her time in the world of comedy has seen her face outrageous levels of sexism and racism from her male and female peers. Set to soar on the wings of the box office blazing ‘Girls Trip’, the amiable entertainer thanked fans for their support by welcoming them into her world via a live chat hours ago. What she revealed will leave you shocked, confused and enraged.

 

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Kagame takes over AU leadership, commits to visa-free regime

 

The new African Union chairperson, Paul Kagame, has said that ‘Free Movement’ for Africans ‘is achievable in 2018’.  Free Movement which is part of the African Prosperity Agenda would entail the implementation of continent-wide visa-free  regimes including the issuance  of visas at ports of entry for Africans. ‘‘Today we launch the Single African Air Transport Market (SAATM). We are nearly ready to launch the Continental Free Trade Area, and freedom of movement of persons is achievable in 2018.’‘

 


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Diaspora News

 

Mangueira Samba School Ready for Rio 2018 Carnival

 

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – On Sunday, February 11th, Mangueira samba school will be starring at Carnival 2018. The sixth Grupo Especial (Special Group) school to parade at this year’s championship is expected to enter the Sapucaí at 2:40 AM (already on Monday), and will be watched closely as it calls attention to Mayor Crivella’s cuts on Rio’s Carnival. Competence and professionalism perfectly define Mangueira, nineteen times winner of the Grupo Especial championship – only standing behind Portela samba school. Born in the Mangueira favela community, in Zona Norte (North Zone), in 1928, Mangueira is, undoubtedly, an inspirational model for the younger samba schools in Rio de Janeiro.

 

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Why Black Lawmakers Wore Kente Cloth 


 

In the days leading up to Trump's State of the Union Address, several black lawmakers announced plans to boycott the event in opposition of Trump’s racist and divisive rhetoric and policies. Representatives John Lewis, Maxine Waters and Frederica S. Wilson were among the several black lawmakers who chose not to attend the Tuesday evening speech. While the absence of these important figures was extremely symbolic, representatives of the Congressional Black Caucus who did attend made their own emblematic pledge against the chaotic state of the executive branch. In opposition of Trump referring to Africa and Haiti as “sh*thole countries", members of the CBC signaled their allegiance to the nations by adorning their formal wear with traditional African kente cloth.

 

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 African News

North Africans hope giving couscous world heritage status will bring them together

 

 

After years of diplomatic standoffs over terrorism, resources and territory, North African nations hope one dish can finally bring to the same table: couscous. A group of experts from the Maghreb region have come together to work on a common campaign to have couscous recognized by Unesco's list of intangible cultural heritage. . The small balls of rolled and crushed wheat or cereals  is usually steamed and is the staple for many in North Africa, and a readymade version can be found in most grocery stores around the world.


 

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A united African front necessary to end

economics of neo-colonialism

 

Political Science and Public Policy Professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, Jean-Germain Gros, has said that in order  to end the exploitation of Africa’s natural resources to sustain the economies of their former colonies, African leaders must come together to build African-centric economies.  He explained that an effective Africa-centric  would require that raw materials such as cocoa, minerals and wood be processed into finished products in Africa rather than sold in raw forms at generally low prices to the continent’s detriment would require   that raw materials such as cocoa, minerals and wood be processed into finished products in Africa rather than sold in raw forms at generally low prices to the continent’s detriment.

 

 

History Tidbits

Scholars focus on the Arab trans-Saharan slave trade

 

 

 

 

Scholars from universities in and outside Africa gathered in the Nigerian city of Calabar recently to examine the role of Arab merchants in the trans-Saharan slave trade, which lasted for 17 centuries. For various reasons, the trans-Saharan slave trade – unlike trans-Atlantic slavery – is under-studied.  The international seminar was organised by UNESCO and the Centre for Black and African Arts and Civilisation, or CBAAC, a Nigerian government agency. Papers presented agreed that both slave trades were unprecedented in history and responsible for the deportation of millions of Africans to various parts  of the world.

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 Black Pirates

  

During the ‘ Golden Age of Piracy' Some estimate that nearly 5,000 pirates hunted prey between 1715 and 1726. Of that number, about twenty-five to thirty percent came from the cimarrons, black slaves who ran from their Spanish masters. Other blacks joined after pirates attacked slave ships. For example, when Sam Bellamy and his fellow pirates seized a “Guinea Ship,” twenty-five blacks went on the account. Stede Bonnet’s crew also included former slaves and freemen, and of the eighty sea rovers who followed John Lewis were numbered at least forty blacks from English colonies. Francis Sprigg’s cook was black and entrusted with dividing the spoils equally for the crew.  Not all black pirates were known by name. For example, thirty men escaped enslavement on Saint Thomas and went on the account in August 1699. A mulatto amongst Stede Bonnet’s crew had a confrontation with a white sailor who refused to sign the articles of agreement. After cursing the man, the black pirate wondered “why I did not go to the pump and work among the rest, and told me that was my Business and that I should be used as a Negroe.” (Kinkor, 199) Captain Bonnet overheard the exchange and concurred with the pirate – a man was either a sea rover or a slave, regardless of his color or status.

 

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