Welcome to the

AHMC365 Newsletter

Vol 48

 

April 1,  2018

 


April Fools' Day (sometimes called All Fools' Day) is an informal holiday celebrated every year on April The day is not a national holiday in any country, but it is widely recognized and celebrated as a day when people play practical jokes and hoaxes on each other, called April fools.Hoax stories are also often found in the press and media on this day.
 

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Featured News

 

Student Debt Cancellation a Viable Option, Economists Say

 

 SHARMINI PERIES: It's The Real News Network. I'm Sharmini Peries coming to you from Baltimore. Student debt is currently the fastest growing form of debt in the United States. More than 44 million Americans owe a total of $1.4 trillion. This is more than is owed on all credit cards or on all other loans. It's the second highest form of household debt after mortgage debt. Last month, Trump's Department of Education, under the leadership of Betsy DeVos, said that they will issue a rule to the states prohibiting them from regulating student debt collection agencies.   

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'Black Panther' to discuss

African colonialism & American Racism

 

 

Tess Raser’s students have been studying colonialism in Africa for a month now. Next week — as part of the lesson plan — she intends to take her sixth graders to see Marvel’s Black Panther. For Raser, who teaches at an elementary school in Chicago’s South Side, Black Panther invites her students to meditate on Africa and its diaspora through the imaginary country of Wakanda.

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5 Innovative Initiatives Transforming Education in Africa


 

One of the biggest flaws in the education system is the assumption that all children learn in the same way. A single, age-old learning method of sitting behind a desk and absorbing facts and numbers is still used across the world. While this technique works for some learners, it does a disservice to others, who are left feeling academically inadequate A math teacher in Cape Town is turning the tradtional teaching methoc on its head.  He is using rap mjusic to help leaners remember their mutiliplication tables.

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Diaspora News

Why Are Black Incarceration Rates Dropping While White Rates Rise?


 
At first glance, tennis star Serena Williams and the late activist Erica Garner don’t have much in common. They lived different lives on different ends of the socioeconomic spectrum. But as black women in America, they both shared horrifying stories due to complications from childbirth. Our country spends more  on health care than any other high-income country — but still holds the worst record for maternal mortality in the developed world.

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Venezuela's Arreaza Calls for 'Africa-Latin America Unity
 

In the days leading up to Trump's State of the Union Address, several black lawmakers announced plans to boycott the event in opposition of Trump’s racist and divisive rhetoric and policies. Representatives John Lewis, Maxine Waters and Frederica S. Wilson were among the several black lawmakers who chose not to attend the Tuesday evening speech. 

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African News

Ethiopian Airlines  all-female crew

for historic Argentina flight

 

 Exactly ten years ago at the annual meeting of the Oromo Studies Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America, the late, great Kenyan comparativist and philosopher Ali Mazrui gave the keynote speech. With his characteristic flamboyance, fresh comparisons and massive generalisations, Mazrui spoke about what he called the largest ethnic nation in Eastern Africa, the Oromo. What did Mazrui, who was regarded as one of the top 100 public intellectuals in the world, had to say about the Oromo?

 
 

The Oromo of Eastern Africa:

A Mazulana Perspective

Exactly ten years ago at the annual meeting of the Oromo Studies Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America, the late, great Kenyan comparativist and philosopher Ali Mazrui gave the keynote speech. With his characteristic flamboyance, fresh comparisons and massive generalisations, Mazrui spoke about what he called the largest ethnic nation in Eastern Africa, the Oromo. What did Mazrui, who was regarded as one of the top 100 public intellectuals in the world, had to say about the Oromo? And what are the wider implications?  Given the fact that the Oromo have been in the news lately in connection with their growing demand for self-determination in the face of the rapidly changing political situation in Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, I believe that this is an opportune time to ponder these questions.  His observations also elucidate the Oromo question from international and comparative perspectives.  What follows is an adaptation of the relevant parts of Mazrui’s keynote speech—mostly in his own words.
 
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History Tidbits

Did African Slaves Revolt in Iraq?

 

The Zanj were Bantu-speaking slaves who had been imported from Africa and who were primarily utilized for agricultural labor as part of the plantation economy of southern Iraq. The demand for servile labor during this period was fueled by wealthy residents of the port city of Basra, who had acquired extensive marshlands in the surrounding region. These lands had been abandoned as a result of peasant migration and repeated flooding over time, but they could be converted back into cultivatable status through intensive labor.

Local magnates were able to gain ownership of this land on the condition that they would make it arable. As a result, they acquired large numbers of Zanj and other slaves, who were placed into work camps and tasked with clearing away the nitrous topsoil as part of the reclamation process. Other Zanj were used to work in the salt flats of lower Iraq, especially in the area around Basra.


 

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10 Facts About The Arab Enslavement Of Black People Not Taught In Schools

  

 The number of people enslaved by Muslims has been a hotly debated topic, especially when the millions of Africans forced from their homelands are considered. Some historians estimate that between A.D. 650 and 1900, 10 to 20 million people were enslaved by Arab slave traders. Others believe over 20 million enslaved Africans alone had been delivered through the trans-Sahara route alone to the Islamic world. Dr. John Alembellah Azumah in his 2001 book, The Legacy of Arab-Islam in Africa estimates that over 80 million Black people more died en route.

 

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